Day 12 on Trans-Siberian Railway: Tales from Siberia

Today’s adventure takes us to Olkhon island on Lake Baikal. To get there it is a 3 hour drive from Bugul’deyka. Again on dusty, bumpy roads… It seems like I will be saying these words far too often on this side of the earth.

IMG_3403

The landscape is nevertheless breathtaking. From a salt lake to taiga forests to grasslands and panoramic hills. Volodya for sure knows all the secret spots.

Roads like these are the standard this side of Russia

Roads like these are the standard this side of Russia

Our ride looking like it is just made for these landscapes

Our ride looking like it is just made for these landscapes

IMG_0509

On top of a hill overlooking Lake Baikal we meet Kostya – a local of the area in the midst of doing stretches and weight-lifting. He could easily be going for the young Siberian Rambo title. Very determined in his demeanour, we exchange a greeting, as Kostya is eager to show off his English skills. After a few minutes of introduction, he turns off to his Rambo activities in the scorching heat, while I turn away to get deeply engrossed in photographing the beautiful wild flowers of Siberia. Within a day in the area this has quickly become my favourite past time.

Aren't they just gorgeous <3

Aren’t they just gorgeous <3

Leaving the Siberian Rambo behind we continue towards the main attraction – Shamanka Rock. Now Buryats religion is shamanism and there are traces of it everywhere in this part of Siberia. As we drive along we often see Volodya raise up his right hand in a gesture of greeting. Greeting the spirits that protect the areas he says. Shamanka Rock is the center of shamanism.

Shamanka Rock

Shamanka Rock

As you drive along in Buryat lands you will notice colourful pillars erected along the roads. They are are called sergeh (ritual) pillars. They are needed so the spirits can come down from the sky and tie their horses to the pillars.

Sergeh pillars at Shamanka Rock

Sergeh pillars at Shamanka Rock

The pillar is a symbol of the tree of life, uniting three worlds. Three horizontal rings are carved on the pillar. The upper ring is for the gods to tie their horses when descending onto the earth, the middle one is for the humans and the lower – for the horses of the underground world.

Prayers made out of colourful clothing pieces are tied to sergeh pillars

Prayers written on colourful clothing pieces are tied to sergeh pillars

By the pillars we also find broken cigarets, rice and coins with eagle side up and an unusual smell. Volodya’s calm voice is heard again explaining that those are offerings to the spirits. Apparently there are different offering classes, the best being milk vodka the smell of which is what I apparently was met with (not a pleasant one I can tell you), wheat products coming second, followed by broken cigarets and coins. Coins need to be with the eagle side up.

Offering to the spirits

Offering to the spirits

The religious matters settled, for us the most beautiful draw of the area is the view to Lake Baikal. And what a serene view it is – out of this world beautiful.

internal.fb676d720a9478a3c26f42ce3bb748b5.DO01034206

internal.e85baf4f5fda8432c522ea88fc834540.DO01034204

Heading back on the dusty, bumpy roads we get home tired and smiling from the day’s adventure. I get back to my evening favourite past-time – chasing the unraveling generic drug saga and transferring my travel memories on the digital ink. Andreas strikes up a half-German, quarter-Russian and quarter hand gesture conversation with Volodya which basically revolves around paydyom plavat (let’s go swimming) and heads off to do sunset pictures of and swimming in Lake Baikal.

IMG_3347

Photos © Andreas Eriksen & Ani Movsisyan